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Liver Failure

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LIVER FAILURE IN DOGS

WHAT DO YOU NEED TO DO NOW

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MY DOG HAS BEEN DIAGNOSE WITH LIVER FAILURE

The liver is an organ that performs numerous functions. It has a large storage capacity and functional reserve and is capable of regenerating. These properties provide some protection against permanent damage. However, the liver is also susceptible to injury because of its role in metabolizing, detoxifying, and storing various toxic compounds.

Early treatment is critical for dogs with acute liver failure. Your veterinarian will prescribe specific treatment if an underlying cause be identified. In cases of longterm or end-stage liver disease, and in cases of acute liver disease when no under-lying cause has been identified, supportive treatment is directed at slowing progression of disease and minimizing complications.

Signs that a dog has liver disease can vary and include loss of appetite, vomiting, stomach ulceration, diarrhea, seizures or other neurologic problems, fever, blood clotting problems, jaundice (a yellow tinge noticeable in the skin, mucous membranes, and eyes), fluid collection in the abdomen, excessive urination and thirst, changes in liver size, and weight loss. Gastrointestinal bleeding can be seen in animals with liver disease due to ulcers or problems with blood clotting. The veterinarian’s understanding of the potential causes of each of these signs helps him or her to diagnose illness and provide appropriate treatment.

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LIVER DISEASES IN DOGS

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SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]It’s easy to miss the symptoms of liver disease. They’re similar to those for other problems.

Your dog’s symptoms may include:

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[fusion_li_item icon=””]Loss of appetite[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Weight loss[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Vomiting or diarrhea[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Increased thirst[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]An unstable walk[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Increased need to pee[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Confusion[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Yellowish eyes, tongue, or gums (jaundice)[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Signs of weakness[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Blood in his pee or poop[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Seizures[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Ascites (a build-up of fluid in the belly)

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If your dog’s liver disease isn’t caught early, it can lead to a serious brain condition called hepatic encephalopathy.

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LIVER DISEASES IN DOGS

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SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

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Hearing a heart murmur during a routine physical examination will often be the first hint to your veterinarian that your pet has heart disease. Hearing a murmur is only a hint that something may be wrong (a clinical sign), not a final diagnosis. However, some veterinarian might not recommend a echocardiography or an ultrasound and prescribe Fortekor and Frusemide immediately.

Hearing a murmur is THE reason to consider more discussion and tests to determine the cause of the murmur (the diagnosis). Your veterinarian needs to discuss with you further test after knowing the initial diagnosis. Always request for a EKG electrocardiogram if the veterinarian suspect your pet has heart murmur.

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THINGS THAT CAN HELP THE HEART

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NUTRACEUTICAL

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Nutraceuticals represent a new opportunity in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Their effective action and high safety level offer a bright prospect for the future in both the healthy and the unhealthy. If your dog has been diagnosed with heart disease whether it is canine heart murmur, valvular disease, enlarged heart, dilated cardiomyopathy or congestive heart failure there are things you can do to improve your dogs health and well-being. You can also expand their life span.

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Taurine was found to exhibit diverse biological actions, including protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury, modulation of intracellular calcium concentration, and antioxidant, antiatherogenic and blood pressure-lowering effects.

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[fusion_li_item icon=””]Taurine-deficient dilated cardiomyopathy in Golden Retrievers[/fusion_li_item]
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L-carnitine is an amino acid (a building block for proteins) that is naturally produced in the body. It has used for conditions of the heart and blood vessels including heart-related chest pain, congestive heart failure (CHF), heart complications of a disease called diphtheria, heart attack, leg pain caused by circulation problems (intermittent claudication), and high cholesterol.

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[fusion_li_item icon=””]Carnitine and its role in cardiovascular disease[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of L-carnitine in congestive heart failure[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]L-carnitine treatment for congestive heart failure–experimental and clinical study[/fusion_li_item]
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Hawthorn (Crataegus species) has been used to treat heart disease as far back as the 1st century. By the early 1800s, American doctors were using it to treat circulatory disorders and respiratory illnesses. Traditionally, the berries were used to treat heart problems ranging from irregular heartbeat, high blood pressure, chest pain, hardening of the arteries, and heart failure.

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[fusion_li_item icon=””]Hawthorn[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) in the treatment of cardiovascular disease[/fusion_li_item]
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Coenzyme Q10, fat-soluble substance, which resembles a vitamin, is present in most eukaryotic cells, primarily in the mitochondria. It is a component of the electron transport chain and participates in aerobic cellular respiration, which generates energy in the form of ATP. Ninety-five percent of the human body’s energy is generated this way. Therefore, those organs with the highest energy requirements—such as the heart, liver, and kidney—have the highest CoQ10 concentrations.

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[fusion_li_item icon=””]Coenzyme Q10 for heart failure.[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Role of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in cardiac disease[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Coenzyme Q10 in patients with end-stage heart failure[/fusion_li_item]
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The three types of omega-3 fatty acids involved in human physiology are α-linolenic acid (ALA) (found in plant oils), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (both commonly found in marine oils). Marine algae and phytoplankton are primary sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Common sources of plant oils containing the omega-3 ALA fatty acid include walnut, edible seeds, clary sage seed oil, algal oil, flaxseed oil, Sacha Inchi oil, Echium oil, and hemp oil, while sources of animal omega-3 EPA and DHA fatty acids include fish oils, egg oil, squid oils, and krill oil.

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[fusion_li_item icon=””]Omega-3 Supplements and Cardiovascular Diseases[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: epidemiology[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]Omega-3 Fatty acids for cardiovascular disease prevention[/fusion_li_item]
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A natural ingredient for building new ATP (adenosine triphosphate), D-ribose is an important component of a “cardiac rejuvenation” regimen. Animal studies show that it dramatically increases ATP levels in the critical reperfusion period after a heart attack (the time when blood flow is restored and cells use energy at extremely high levels to repair the damage).

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[fusion_li_item icon=””]D-ribose aids congestive heart failure patients[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]D-Ribose as a supplement for cardiac energy metabolism[/fusion_li_item]
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L-Arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid found in the diet. It is a dietary supplement used mostly by athletic people because it is the amino acid that directly produces Nitric Oxide via the nitric oxide synthase enzymes. In the body, the amino acid arginine changes into nitric oxide (NO). Nitric oxide is a powerful neurotransmitter that helps blood vessels relax and also improves circulation.

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[fusion_li_item icon=””]How L-arginine Works[/fusion_li_item]
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The U.S. National Library of Medicine considers milk thistle to be a powerful anti-inflammatory, stopping inflammation, which is one of the main causes of heart disease. Milk thistle benefits heart health and helps lower high cholesterol levels by lowering inflammation, cleaning the blood and preventing oxidative stress damage within the arteries.

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Vitamin E improves circulation and promotes normal blood clotting and is known to help the red blood cells to live longer. In the 1940s, Drs. Wilfrid and Evan Shute, who were brothers, began a 40-year study of the effects of vitamin E on the heart. Wilfrid Shute’s research involved dogs as well as humans, for he was a show judge and Doberman Pinscher breeder. Soon, thanks to his efforts, vitamin E improved the health of dogs around the world.

As Wendell O. Belfield, DVM, reports in his classic book How to Have a Healthier Dog, many of these cases were dramatic. In 1945, Dr. N. H. Lambert in Dublin, Ireland, learned of the Shute brothers’ work and began giving vitamin E to dogs, the first of which, a nine-year-old Griffon, was dying of heart disease complicated by an inflammatory uterine condition. Conventional treatment had been unsuccessful. “Placed on vitamin E, she made a spectacular recovery,” Dr. Belfield reports. “Lambert said she became quite rejuvenated and lived for another six years.

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[fusion_li_item icon=””]Vitamin E and cardiovascular disease[/fusion_li_item]
[fusion_li_item icon=””]A study of heart diseases without clinical signs of heart failure in 47 cattle[/fusion_li_item]
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