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WHAT IS TUI-NA FOR PETS

treatment to address specific patterns of disharmony

In memories of all immobile dogs that were not given a second chance

History of Tui-Na

Tui-na (推拿) is a traditional Chinese manual therapy, the term tui na (pronounced “twee naw“), which literally means “pinch and pull,” refers to a wide range of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) therapeutic massage and bodywork. It has been used for over 3000 years since the 11th centuries BC and references to this treatment can be found in the Huang Di Nei Jing (黄帝内经)(Yellow Emperors Inner Classic, written in 475-221 BC).

Tui-na is not generally used for pleasure and relaxation, but rather as a treatment to address specific patterns of disharmony. As such, practitioners use it for many of the same reasons and according to the same principles as acupuncture. Like acupuncture, TCM uses tui na to harmonize yin and yang in the body by manipulating the Qi in the acupuncture channels.

The roots of Tui-Na (also spelled tuina) were developed long before acupuncture, using manual stimulation of affected areas to bring about pain relief. Primitive man instinctively knew that by rubbing painful areas on the body, the discomfort would be lessened. With the discovery and evolution of acupuncture meridian theory, Chinese massage therapy also evolved, first known as An Mo (pushing & kneading) in ancient times.

Currently, it’s still well used for human and pet over the world as an effective physical therapy.

The Main Functions

From a conventional medicine perspective, Tui-na can be thought of as corresponding to a combination of acupressure, conventional massage and chiropractic techniques. It can be used to regulate the Channels, soothe joints and sinews, promote circulation of Qi气and Blood, strengthen the immune system and promote normal function of the Zang-Fu organs (脏腑器官).

Tui-na is most commonly used to treat acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions and is also useful as a preventative medicine therapy, because it promotes balance in the body. It can also be used in conjunction with and to enhance acupuncture and herbal treatments.

REFERENCES

Dr. Shen Xie
Founder of Chi Institure of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine

Cindy West, DVM, CVA, CVH
Providing holistic and integrated veterinary medicine. Including acupuncture, prescription herbal medications, nutritional counseling, and acupressure.

Bruce Ferguson, DVM, MS
Dr. Bruce Ferguson is an internationally renowned clinician and lecturer in TCVM who is known for his information-packed enthusiastic presentations. He is the president of the American Association of TCVM (www.aatcvm.org) and publishes clinical research and practical application articles in the only English-language Evidence-Based Medicine TCVM journal in the world (www.ajtcvm.org). 

Jeffrey Feinman, DVM, BA, VMD, CVH

Jeffrey Feinman holds both molecular biology and veterinary degrees from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Jeff was the first dual degree recipient at Penn in the prestigious University Scholar program (which was designed to foster medical scientists).

TCM IN the veterinarian PRACTISE 

In TCM theory, the lung dominates the Qi, skin, and hair, and regulates the water passages. Therapeutic manipulation (massage) of the body surface can improve the function of skin and body surface’s immune system function and therefore affect the Lung function, consequently improve the Qi movement. In TCM theory, the Spleen dominates the muscle and limbs and is the generator of Qi and Blood. Acupressure or Tui-na of the muscles can regulate the function of the Spleen and therefore influence the formation of Qi and Blood and strengthen the limbs.

 

Restoration The Balance of Yin and Yang

According to TCM, any disease is caused by an imbalance of Yin and Yang. In order to restore the balance, the Tonifying method is used for Deficiency, and the Sedation method is used for Excess. Tonify is to increase organ, system or channel function or integrity in the case of hypofunction. Sedation refers to reducing the hyperactivity or hypersecretion in an organ or body system.

 

Veterinary Indications of Tui-Na

Musculoskeletal Conditions

Those conditions that are amenable to treatment with Tui-na include generalized muscle pain, thoracolumbar pain, fee pain, laminitis, osteoarthritis, cervical pain, lumbosacral pain, lumbar sprain/strain, tendonitis, and mild ligament injuries. 

Internal Medicine Disorders

Internal medicine conditions that respond well to Tui-na treatment, include anorexia, non-infectious diarrhea, reduced gastrointestinal motility, dysuria, Bi syndromes, Wei syndromes, headaches, hemiplegia, peripheral facial paralysis, cough, asthma, acute and chronic bronchitis, disorders of pregnancy and parturition, cardiovascular disease, anxiety, sleep disorders, and generalized stress.

Various Geriatric Conditions

Geriatric conditions that may be gently treated with Tui-na with few deleterious side effects include general weakness, stiffness, osteoarthritis, Bi syndromes, Wei syndromes, sleeping disorders, and various neurovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

Pediatric Diseases

Pediatric conditions that may be treated with good success include viral infections, cough, fever, diarrhea, infantile malnutrition, enuresis, torticollis, infantile paralysis, and tendon contracture.

Disease Prevention

Many Tui-na experts believe that disease prevention may be one important function of Tui-na manipulation based upon Patten Differentiation

Performance Enhancement

Performance enhancement has been demonstrated in human athletes treated with Tui-na and believed to be true in equine athletes as well.

Comparision Between Tui-Na and other TCVM Modalities

Tui-na is one of the five branches of TCM. The practice is under the guidance of TCM theories and principles, which include Zang-Fu, Five Element, four diagnostics methods, and Eight Principles. In general, TCVM can be divided into Li-Theory, Fa-Strategy, Fang-Method, and Yao-Protocol.

  • Li-Theory means the physiology and pathology of TCM
  • Fa-Strategy is the diagnostics of TCM and therapeutic strategies
  • Fang-Method refers to the formulation of therapeutics
  • Yao-Protocol includes herbs, needle, and manipulations 

 

Conditions Benefiting from Tui-Na

  1. Neck / shoulder pain
  2. Back/ hip pain
  3. Shoulder joint pain
  4. Leg/ ankle pain
  5. Sciatica
  6. Muscle spasms
  7. Muscle, tendon, ligament and other skeletal conditions
  8. Aging issues such as arthritis, loss of vitality, weakness and joint stiffness
  9. Respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive and immune system disorders
    It can also enhance mental focus, sensory acuity and help create a general sense of well-being.

NO KNOWN side effects of tui-na

Small animals, large animals, and exotic species all respond well to Tui-na, and it can be administered on animals that will not allow the insertion of acupuncture needles. It is safe and effective with no known side effects.

Contraindications and Cautions of Tui-Na

If the animal is frail – Very old and/or very weak animals may become depleted or weakened by therapeutic manipulation if too vigorous or prolonged duration.

Acute Fracture sites may be too painful for any form of manipulation in a conscious patient

During pregnancy : Pregnancy may be interrupted or prematurely terminated if abdominal acupuncture points are stimulated too vigorously

If the animal has an infectious disease : Infectious and epidemic diseases should be treated with consideration of both zoonotic and iatrogenic transmission potential.

Immediately after a large meal : Immediately after food intake, the bowel should be allowed to have blood shunted for digestion and absorption. It is best to wait at least 30 minutes after a meal before any form of Tui-na.

When undiagnosed masses are present : Masses of unknown origin should be investigated for infectious or neoplastic etiologies and avoided if either is determined

On or around skin eruptions or bleeding : Serious dermatitis or injured skin may be irritated by many Tui-na techniques.

enhance mental focus, sensory acuity and help create a general sense of well-being

Conditions Benefiting from Tui-Na

  1. Neck / shoulder pain
  2. Back/ hip pain
  3. Shoulder joint pain
  4. Leg/ ankle pain
  5. Sciatica
  6. Muscle spasms
  7. Muscle, tendon, ligament and other skeletal conditions
  8. Aging issues such as arthritis, loss of vitality, weakness and joint stiffness
  9. Respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive and immune system disorders
    It can also enhance mental focus, sensory acuity and help create a general sense of well-being.

NO KNOWN side effects of tui-na

Small animals, large animals, and exotic species all respond well to Tui-na, and it can be administered on animals that will not allow the insertion of acupuncture needles. It is safe and effective with no known side effects.

Techniques of Tui-na

Mo-fa (touching skin and muscle), Rou-fa (rotary kneading), Ca-fa (rubbing), Tui-fa (pushing), An-fa (pressing), Nie-fa (pinching), Dou-fa (shaking), Ba-sheng-fa (stretching) and Cuo-fa (kneading).

TUI-NA at home

Our staffs in RA healing center receive specialized training in the techniques and applications of Tui-na. To accelerate the healing process and deepen the connection between you and your fluffy family member, we would like to teach owners or caretakers several Tui-na techniques for home treatments.

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